Conversion

I had a thought,
That came to my mind.
Why it stayed,
I don’t know.

It caused me distress,
And gave me no rest,
For it refused to go.

It was an unpleasant thought.
And I feared:
I might commit the action,
The thought,
Represented in my mind.

And still it lingers on.
Where it came from,
I’m not sure.
But I suspect,
It came from those,
Deep recesses in my mind.

It must’ve happened,
That one time–
I sank so low.

How I survived it,
I don’t recall.
But I must’ve been rescued,
And then revived.

By: ElRoy © 2019

Chronic worrying is not permanent. It’s a mental habit that can be broken. You can train your brain to look at life from a different perspective.
“Chronic worriers show an increased incidence of coronary problems and suppressed immune functioning. Dwelling on the past or the future also takes us away from the present, rendering us unable to complete the work currently on our plates. If you ask ruminators how they are feeling, none will say “happy.” Most feel miserable.” Says Nicholas Petrie, Center for Creative Leadership.
“Find a constructive way of processing any worries or negative thoughts, write your thoughts down in a journal every night before bed or first thing in the morning–they don’t have to be in any order. Do a ‘brain dump’ of everything on your mind onto the page. Sometimes that can afford a sense of relief.” Recommends Honey Langcaster-James, Psychologist.

Excerpts from: https://medium.com/kaizen-habits/psychologists-explain-how-to-stop-overthinking-everything-e527962a393

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