Regime Change

I should’ve never dived head first,
into this cesspool of greed and deception.
I should’ve probed the water first.
I haven’t been able to change—
not even one, of those extremist ideologies.

I used to be content in my space—
writing my liberty rhymes.
But when I became aware of the injustices,
I was obliged to protest with political poetry.

Trying to turn the tide,
in the evil hearts of men—
but the waves keep crashing in…

Oh, how my eyes burn from the smoke—
when will the people learn—there’s fallout
when you can’t obey “The Golden Rule”?

Lord Jesus, please save us
from the supremacists encroaching.

By: ElRoy © 2021

Listen to Jason Gray—Fear Is Easy, Love Is Hard song

The righteous care about justice for the poor, but the wicked have no such concern. Where there is no vision, the people perish… Many seek the ruler’s favor; but every man’s judgment comes from The Lord.  Bible, Proverbs 29:7,18,26

There is a way that appears to be right, but in the end it leads to death. The simple believe anything, but the prudent give thought to their steps. The wise fear The Lord and shun evil, but a fool is hotheaded and yet feels secure. 14:12,15,16

“We must choose to live in this world and to project our own meaning and value onto it in order to make sense of it. This means that people are free and burdened by it, since with freedom there is a terrible, even debilitating, responsibility to live and act authentically. Every human is free, but freedom itself is relative; one must embrace limits, moderation, ‘calculated risk’; absolutes are anti-human. ‘I choose freedom. For even if justice is not realized, freedom maintains the power of protest against injustice and keeps communication open.’”

Quotes by: Albert Camus, (1913 – 1960)—French philosopher, Nobel laureate, 1957

(Is this is what happens when polarization takes hold of society?) “If you are thoroughly committed to an idea, are you compelled to kill for it? What price for justice? What price for freedom? Absolutism, and the impossible idealism it inspires, is a dangerous path forward.”

Excerpts from How Camus and Sartre split up over the question of how to be free

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